19-09-2022

The James Webb Space Telescope captured its first images and spectra of Mars on September 5, 2022. The telescope’s remarkable infrared sensitivity provides a unique perspective on our neighboring planet, complementing data collected by orbiters, rovers, and other telescopes.

Because it is so close, the Red Planet is one of the brightest objects in the night sky in terms of both visible light (which human eyes can see) and the infrared light that Webb is designed to detect. This poses special challenges to the facility, which was built to detect the extremely faint light of the most distant galaxies in the universe. Webb’s instruments are so sensitive that without special observing techniques, the bright infrared light from Mars is saturating the detector.

03/08/2022

The final programme of the EPSC 2022 has been announced. In particular the schedule of the RoadMap session “Martian dust and clouds: from lab to space” (TP6) is now known: two oral sessions will take place on Tuesday 20 Sept. (15:30-16:55) and Wednesday 21 Sept. (10:00-11:30) and posters will be on show on Monday 19 Sept. (18:45-20:15).


We are pleased to host 11 posters and 14 talks, inluding the folowing sollicited ones

  • Spectropolarimetry of Mars: Why and how?, Daphne Stam
  • The diurnal and seasonal variation of dust observed by the Perseverance rover and Emirates Mars Mission, Michael Smith, Khalid Badri, Samuel Atwood, Germán Martínez, Eduardo Sebastián, Victor Apéstigue, Ignacio Arruego, Daniel Toledo, Daniel Viúdez, Jose Antonio Manfredi, Christopher Edwards, Nathan Smith, Christopher Wolfe, Michael Wolff, Philip Christensen, Saadat Anwar, Mark Lemmon, Eman AlTunaiji, and Manuel de la Torre
  • A lower-than-expected saltation threshold at Martian pressure and below, Philippe Claudin, Bruno Andreotti, Jens Jacob Iversen, Jonathan P Merrison, and Keld Romer Rasmussen
  • Retrieving scattering properties of Martian dust analogues by modelling light scattering, Julia Martikainen, Olga Muñoz, Teresa Jardiel, Marco Peiteado, Juan Carlos Gómez Martín, and the RoadMap Team
  • A laboratory study on sand grain impacts and their role in releasing fine dust into the Martian atmosphere, Tim Becker, Gerhard Wurm, and Jens Teiser

The full details can be found at: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2022/session/44664

20/06/2022

RoadMap partners presented their advances at the 7th Mars Atmosphere Modelling and Observations (MAMO) workshop, which was held in Paris, France from June 14 to 17.
We had several talks and posters showing the results obtained so far.

 

  • posters:
    • RoadMap - from Lab to Space: Experimental Scattering Matrices of Martian Dust Analogues; Munoz O. et al.
    • Retrieval of Optical Constants at UV-VIS-NIR for Martian Dust Analogues by Modelling Light Scattering, Martikainen J. et al.
    • Aerosol Nadir Retrieval from NOMAD/UVIS on board Exomars TGO, Willame Y. et al.
    • Dust Climatology from NOMAD UVIS Channel, Flimon Z. et al.
    • Ozone Observed by TGO/NOMAD-UVIS Solar Occultation: an Intercomparison of three Retrieval Methods, Piccialli A. et al.
    • RoadMap - from Lab to Space: Applying an Updated Dust Lifting Equation in the GEM-Mars GCM, Neary L. et al.

 

  • Orals:
    • Relationship Between the Ozone and Water Vapour Vertical Profiles on Mars Observed by NOMAD-TGO, Piccialli A. et al.
    • Simulating Atmospheric Chemistry and D/H during the 2018 Global Dust Storm on Mars , Daerden F. et al.
    • Mesospheric Carbon Dioxide and Temperature Retrievals From NOMAD-SO Onboard TGO, Trompet L. et al.

05/05/2022

The RoadMap project, its teams and their research are represented at the ExoMars exhibition of the (Flemish) Astropolis Space Science Center in Ostend, Belgium. The exhibition is centered around ESA's Mars missions and wil be open to the public from April 1 until October 31, 2022.

for more details: RoadMap features in Astropolis ExoMars exhibition (Belgium)


23/3/2022

The session “Martian dust and clouds: from lab to space” (TP6) proposed by the RoadMap consortium, has been officially accepted by the Europlanet Science Congress organizers. EPSC will be held in Granada (Spain) from 18 to 23 September 2022.

Martian dust and clouds: from lab to space
Dust and clouds are critical elements in the Martian atmosphere. They control the radiative budget, have an impact on the composition, and affect its dynamical processes.
The aim of this session is to bring together scientists involved in modelling and observing Martian dust and clouds, from the lab to the analysis of space data. We will consider presentations on observations, field and laboratory experiments covering different aspects of dust and clouds, such as aeolian processes, dust lifting, sedimentation, scavenging, nucleation, aggregation, optical properties including scattering characterization, etc., but also on modelling of these processes from the perspective of implementation in radiative transfer codes or Global Circulation models.
Convener: Olga Muñoz
Co-conveners: Jonathan Merrison, Gerhard Wurm, Ann Carine Vandaele, Hannakaisa Lindqvist, Michael Wolff
Link: